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The Danish girl : a novel
2000
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Fiction/Biography Profile
Awards
2000 - Lambda Literary Award for Best Transgender winner
2001 - American Library Association's Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Book Award for Literature nominee
2000 - James Tiptree, Jr. Award for Best Gender-bending SF nominee
Characters
Greta Waud (Female), Artist, American, Widow, Remarried
Einar Wegener (Male), Artist, Danish, Married, Greta's husband; has desires to be a woman
Genre
Historical
Love story
Fiction
Topics
Artists
Love and marriage
Gender identity
Self-sacrifice
Sex change
Setting
Copenhagen, Denmark - Scandinavia
Dresden, Germany - Europe
Paris, France - Europe
Time Period
1920s -- 20th century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

Ebershoff's (www.ebershoff.com) 2000 debut novel, which is currently being adapted into a film starring Nicolas Cage and Nicole Kidman, precedes the New York Times best sellers Pasadena (2002) and The 19th Wife (LJ Audio 10/15/08). Set in 1920s Copen-hagen, Dresden, and Paris, the title is loosely based on the life of Danish painter Einar Wegener, who underwent sex reassignment surgery to become Lili, and explores his/her relationship with wife Greta. As Einar and Greta struggle to learn how to live with Lili, listeners are given an intimate view of a marriage irrevocably altered. While the novel is well written overall, the multitude of flashbacks adds little. Jeff Woodman's (High Deryni) performance is superb, brimming with understated emotion. Recommended for anyone who enjoys stories outside of the mainstream.-Donna Bachowski, Orange Cty. Lib. Syst., Orlando, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

Ebershoff's bestseller-based on the true story of 1920s married artists Einar and Gerda Gottleib Wegener-makes a rocky transition to audio. After posing in women's clothing for his wife's portrait work, Einar explores a preference for appearing as a woman. Eventually, he undergoes sex reassignment surgery and becomes Lili Elbe. The narration switches between Lili's and Gerda's points of view, and listeners might be left wondering why the Einar/Lili characterization seems to be a split personality, with Einar and Lili thinking of the other as separate, and both Einar and Gerda viewing Lili as a third individual. It's a confusing and dry listen made more puzzling by the decision to have the audiobook narrated by a male reader, when so much of the story is told from Gerda and Lili's viewpoints. Nevertheless, Jeff Woodman turns in a solid performance. He has a smooth voice and delivery; he gives Lili with a softness and timidity that sounds fitting and has Gerda sounding more assertive and confident. A Penguin hardcover. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Summary
With pre-publication media and buzz, and sales in ten foreign countries to date, David Ebershoff's The Danish Girl is poised for international success. Inspired by the true story of Danish painter Einar Wegener and his California-born wife, this tender portrait of a marriage asks "What do you do when someone you love wants to change?"<p>Set against the glitz and decadence of 1920s Copenhagen, Dresden, and Paris, The Danish Girl eloquently portrays the intimacy that defines a marriage and the nearly forgotten story of the love between a man who discovers that he is, in fact, a woman and the woman who would sacrifice anything for him. Uniting fact and fiction into a unique romantic vision. The Danish Girl explores the wry heart of what connects men and women -- and what separates them. But this book, like Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha, transcends the confines of sex and gender and historical place. Ultimately, The Danish Girls lush prose and generous emotional insight make it, after the last page is turned, a love story that no reader will soon forget. With The Danish Girl. David Ebershoff will make one of the year's dazzling lit
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