Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Edition:
1st U.S. ed.
Publisher, Date:
New York : Henry Holt and Co., 2009.
Description:
xvii, 532 p. : geneal. tables ; 25 cm.
Summary:
Assuming the power recently lost by the disgraced Cardinal Wolsey, Thomas Cromwell counsels a mercurial Henry VIII on the latter's efforts to marry Anne Boleyn against the wishes of Rome, a successful endeavor that comes with a dangerous price.
Notes:
"A John Macrae book."
Man Booker Prize, 2009.
Subjects:
Genre:
Contents:
Across the narrow sea 1500 -- Paternity 1527 -- At Austin friars 1527 -- Visitation 1529 -- An occult history of Britain 1521-1529 -- Make or mar : All Hallows 1529 -- Three card trick : winter 1529 [to] spring 1530 -- Entirely beloved Cromwell : spring, December 1530 -- The dead complain of their burial : Christmastide 1530 -- Arrange your face 1531 -- "Alas, what shall I do for love?" spring 1532 -- Early mass, November 1532 -- Anna Regina 1533 -- Devil's spit : autumn and winter 1533 -- A painter's eye 1534 -- Supremacy 1534 -- The map of Christendom 1534-1535 -- To Wolf Hall : July 1535.
LCCN:
2009019912
ISBN:
9780805080681
0805080686
System Availability:
8
Current Holds:
0
Control Number:
270142
Other Number:
317928695
# System items in:
7
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Fiction/Biography Profile
Characters
Thomas Cromwell (Male), King's advisor, Minister, One of Henry VIII's closest advisers; fled his father's home; fought for the French; studied law; fluent in French, Latin, and Italian
Genre
Fiction
Historical
Biographical
Topics
Henry VIII, King of England
Power
Court intrigue
Royalty
Heirs
Politicians
Husbands and wives
Divorce
Catholic Church
Ministers
Setting
England - Europe
Time Period
1520s -- 16th century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

As Henry VIII's go-to man for his dirty work, Thomas Cromwell (1485-1540) isn't a likely candidate for a sympathetic portrait. He dirtied his hands too often. In the end, Henry dropped him just as he had Cromwell's mentor, Cardinal Wolsey, who counseled the king before him. But as Mantel (Beyond Black) reminds us, Cromwell was a man of many parts, admirable in many respects though disturbing in others. Above all, he got things done and was deeply loyal to his masters, first Wolsey and then the king. Nor was Henry always bloated and egomaniacal: well into his forties, when in good spirits, the king shone brighter than all those around him. Verdict Longlisted for the Booker Prize, this is in all respects a superior work of fiction, peopled with appealing characters living through a period of tense high drama: Henry's abandonment of wife and church to marry Anne Boleyn. It should appeal to many readers, not just history buffs. And Mantel achieves this feat without violating the historical record! There will be few novels this year as good as this one. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/1/09; history buffs may also enjoy reading Robert Hutchinson's biography, Thomas Cromwell: The Rise and Fall of Henry VIII's Most Notorious Minister, reviewed on p. 66.-Ed.]-David Keymer, Modesto, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

Henry VIII's challenge to the church's power with his desire to divorce his queen and marry Anne Boleyn set off a tidal wave of religious, political and societal turmoil that reverberated throughout 16th-century Europe. Mantel boldly attempts to capture the sweeping internecine machinations of the times from the perspective of Thomas Cromwell, the lowborn man who became one of Henry's closest advisers. Cromwell's actual beginnings are historically ambiguous, and Mantel admirably fills in the blanks, portraying Cromwell as an oft-beaten son who fled his father's home, fought for the French, studied law and was fluent in French, Latin and Italian. Mixing fiction with fact, Mantel captures the atmosphere of the times and brings to life the important players: Henry VIII; his wife, Katherine of Aragon; the bewitching Boleyn sisters; and the difficult Thomas More, who opposes the king. Unfortunately, Mantel also includes a distracting abundance of dizzying detail and Henry's all too voluminous political defeats and triumphs, which overshadows the more winning story of Cromwell and his influence on the events that led to the creation of the Church of England. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Summary
<p> In the ruthless arena of King Henry VIII's court, only one man dares to gamble his life to win the king's favor and ascend to the heights of political power </p> <p>England in the 1520s is a heartbeat from disaster. If the king dies without a male heir, the country could be destroyed by civil war. Henry VIII wants to annul his marriage of twenty years, and marry Anne Boleyn. The pope and most of Europe opposes him. The quest for the king's freedom destroys his adviser, the brilliant Cardinal Wolsey, and leaves a power vacuum.</p> <p>Into this impasse steps Thomas Cromwell. Cromwell is a wholly original man, a charmer and a bully, both idealist and opportunist, astute in reading people and a demon of energy: he is also a consummate politician, hardened by his personal losses, implacable in his ambition. But Henry is volatile: one day tender, one day murderous. Cromwell helps him break the opposition, but what will be the price of his triumph?</p> <p>In inimitable style, Hilary Mantel presents a picture of a half-made society on the cusp of change, where individuals fight or embrace their fate with passion and courage. With a vast array of characters, overflowing with incident, the novel re-creates an era when the personal and political are separated by a hairbreadth, where success brings unlimited power but a single failure means death.</p>
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Book
2009

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