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The Romanovs : the final chapter
1995
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  Library Journal Review

The fall of Soviet communism has sparked a renewed interest in detailing the real history of Russia. Recently opened archives and the decreasing likelihood of personal punishment have allowed historians unparalleled access to information hidden since World War I. Steinberg (history, Yale) and Khrustalev, a Russian historian-archivist, recount the arrest and life under guard of the Romanovs, with reproductions of many letters between Nicholas and Alexandra and documents of primary research. This work is scholarly, well written, and suitable for academic and public libraries. Pulitzer Prize winner Massie (Peter the Great, LJ 9/15/80) takes up where Steinberg leaves off. Massie's work chronicles the events from the death of the Romanovs at the hands of the Bolsheviks until the discovery and recent identification of their remains. Massie does a good job of exposing Romanov imposters, including Anna Anderson, but DNA research does not lend itself to readableness. The short chapters make the book more accessible, but this work does not compare favorably with the best of Massie's works. Together, these books bring to completion the lives of Nicholas and Alexandra. Communist revisionism has been replaced by academic research. [Massie's book was previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/95.]‘Harry Willems, Kansas Lib. System, Iola (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

A recounting of recent controversies in Russia over the burial of the remains of the last imperial family, killed during the Communist revolution. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Summary
In 1991, nine skeletons were exhumed from a shallow grave near Ekaterinberg, Siberia. Were these the remains of the last tsar and his family, murdered over 70 years before? Pulitzer Prize winner Massie now answers this question, going back to the horrifying moments of the slaughter, and describing in detail the ultimately successful efforts in post-communist Russia to discover the truth. of photos. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.
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