Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Publisher, Date:
New York, NY : Sports Publishing, [2014]
Description:
xv, 368 pages, 16 unnumbered pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Summary:
"Charles Albert "The Old Roman" Comiskey was a larger-than-life figure--a man who had precision in his speech and who could work a room with handshakes and smiles. While he has been vilified in film as a rotund cheapskate and the driving force, albeit unknowingly, behind the actions of the 1919 White Sox, who threw the World Series (nicknamed the "Black Sox" scandal), that statement is far from the truth"-- Provided by publisher.
Subjects:
Contents:
Introduction -- Baseball or bust -- The Northwestern League champions -- A sensation in St. Louis -- From manager to magnate -- The complexities of ownership -- Birth of the American League -- Through tragedy to triumph -- Brawls, shootings, and baseball war -- There's a fish in left field -- Seven years of bad luck -- Baseball palace of the world -- Circling the globe -- No longer the "hitless wonders" -- The happiest man in Chicago -- Baseball's money players -- An unforgivable betrayal -- No hearsay, but legal evidence -- Unraveling the conspiracy -- A sorrowful aftermath -- Setting the record straight.
LCCN:
2013041431
ISBN:
9781613216385 (hbk.)
1613216386 (hbk.)
System Availability:
4
Current Holds:
0
Control Number:
1054944
Other Number:
854945637
# System items in:
4
Find It
Map It
Fiction/Biography Profile
Genre
NonFiction
Sports
Topics
Baseball players
Baseball managers
Baseball
World Series (Baseball)
Scandal
Professional sports
Sports
Setting
Chicago, Illinois - Mid-Atlantic States (U.S.)
- United States
Time Period
-- 19th-20th century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

One of the great ironies of baseball's Black Sox scandal-in which eight members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox were found to have helped fix the World Series for gambling interests-is that team owner Charles Comiskey came out as one of the villains in the affair. If that tightfisted owner had only paid his players what they were worth, so the conventional wisdom goes, they wouldn't have been tempted to cheat in the first place. It is this characterization that Hornbaker (Legends of Pro Wrestling) wishes to correct. The book spends less time on the scandal than the title implies; it is really a comprehensive biography of Comiskey. Either way, it is engrossing and provides a much-needed reassessment of the man and his impact on the sport. Hornbaker makes a solid case for rehabilitating Comiskey's reputation. -VERDICT A worthy read for Black Sox buffs and baseball history fans, providing an antidote to the portrayals of Comiskey in Eight Men Out and other books on the scandal and the era.-Brett Rohlwing (BR), Milwaukee P.L. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summary
Charles Albert #147;The Old Roman" Comiskey was a larger-than-life figure#151;a man who had precision in his speech and who could work a room with handshakes and smiles. While he has been vilified in film as a rotund cheapskate and the driving force, albeit unknowingly, behind the actions of the 1919 White Sox, who threw the World Series (nicknamed the #147;Black Sox" scandal), that statement is far from the truth. In his five decades involved in baseball, Comiskey loved the sport through and through. It was his passion, his life blood, and once he was able to combine his love for the game with his managerial skills, it was the complete package for him. There was no other alternative. He brought the White Sox to Chicago in 1900 and was a major influential force in running the American League from its inception.From changing the way the first base position was played, to spreading the concept of #147;small ball" as a manager, to incorporating the community in his team's persona while he was an owner, Comiskey's style and knowledge improved the overall standard for how baseball should be played. Through rigorous research from the National Archives, newspapers, and various other publications, Tim Hornbaker not only tells the full story of Comiskey's incredible life and the sport at the time, but also debunks the #147;Black Sox" controversy, showing that Comiskey was not the reason that the Sox threw the 1919 World Series.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. v
Introductionp. xiii
Chapter 1Baseball or Bustp. 1
Chapter 2The Northwestern League Championsp. 18
Chapter 3A Sensation in St. Louisp. 33
Chapter 4From Manager to Magnatep. 53
Chapter 5The Complexities of Ownershipp. 73
Chapter 6Birth of the American Leaguep. 87
Chapter 7Through Tragedy to Triumphp. 101
Chapter 8Brawls, Shootings, and Baseball Warp. 119
Chapter 9There's a Fish in Left Fieldp. 135
Chapter 10Seven Years of Bad Luckp. 153
Chapter 11Baseball Palace of the Worldp. 171
Chapter 12Circling the Globep. 189
Chapter 13No Longer the "Hitless Wonders"p. 206
Chapter 14The Happiest Man in Chicagop. 221
Chapter 15Baseball's Money Playersp. 238
Chapter 16An Unforgiveable Betrayalp. 261
Chapter 17Not Hearsay, but Legal Evidencep. 282
Chapter 18Unraveling the Conspiracyp. 300
Chapter 19A Sorrowful Aftermathp. 319
Chapter 20Setting the Record Straightp. 341
Acknowledgmentsp. 356
Sourcesp. 358
Indexp. 361
Librarian's View
Book
2014

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