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11/22/63 : a novel
2011
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Fiction/Biography Profile
Characters
Jake Epping (Male), Teacher, High school English teacher; makes extra money teaching adults in the GED program; enters a portal and goes back to 1958 to try and prevent the Kennedy assassination; assumes a new identity
Genre
Fiction
Alternative history
Suspense
Topics
U.S. presidents
Kennedy, John F.
Assassination plots
Time travel
Teachers
Portals
New identities
Librarians
Unexpected love
Assassinations
Mass murder
Family tragedy
False identity
Love
1950s culture
1960s culture
Setting
Maine - New England (U.S.)
Dallas, Texas - South (U.S.)
Texas - South (U.S.)
Time Period
2000's -- 21st century
1958-1960s -- 20th century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

The interesting accents of actor Craig Wasson bring King's time-travel, what-if novel to life. Maine English teacher Jake Epping learns of a time-travel portal in the pantry of a friend's diner. He is urged to go back and prevent the 1963 Kennedy assassination. It takes several attempts for Jake to get the hang of changing things in the past because at times it seems that the past doesn't want to be changed-it can be best to leave it alone! Interesting period detail brings this era into focus, and King subtly alludes to his other novels, including Christine and It, through mentions of characters. This book is recommended to King's fans, historic fiction listeners, and speculative fiction devotees. Of interest is the afterword read by the author himself. ["King remains an excellent storyteller, and his evocation of mid-20th-century America is deft," read the review of the New York Times best-selling Scribner hc, LJ 9/15/11.-Ed.]-David Faucheux, Louisiana Audio Information & Reading Svc., Lafayette (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

In this audio edition of King's latest novel, which uses time travel to re-examine the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, both the author and narrator Craig Wasson deliver the goods. In what proves to be an adventurous, thrilling, thought-provoking, and romantic story, English teacher Jake Epping travels back in time and works to stop Lee Harvey Oswald from assassinating Kennedy. Wasson embodies the good-natured and honorable Epping, while creating accents and speech patterns for the supporting cast, capturing the twang of smalltown Texas high school students, Marina Oswald's struggle with the English language, and Kennedy's Boston accent, which the narrator doesn't overdo. Wasson is even able to provide a credible voice for George de Mohrenschildt, a friend (and possible co-conspirator) of Oswald who speaks English and Russian with a German accent. The audiobook includes an afterword featuring King discussing the book and a little-known vignette his research turned up about Oswald's assassin, Jack Ruby. A Scribner hardcover. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Summary
Stephen King's #1 bestselling time-travel novel--now a limited series on Hulu starring James Franco!<br> <br> On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? In this brilliantly conceived tour de force, Stephen King--who has absorbed the social, political, and popular culture of his generation more imaginatively and thoroughly than any other writer--takes readers on an incredible journey into the past and the possibility of altering it.<br> <br> It begins with Jake Epping, a thirty-five-year-old English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching GED classes. He asks his students to write about an event that changed their lives, and one essay blows him away--a gruesome, harrowing story about the night more than fifty years ago when Harry Dunning's father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a sledgehammer. Reading the essay is a watershed moment for Jake, his life--like Harry's, like America's in 1963--turning on a dime. Not much later his friend Al, who owns the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to the past, a particular day in 1958. And Al enlists Jake to take over the mission that has become his obsession--to prevent the Kennedy assassination.<br> <br> So begins Jake's new life as George Amberson, in a different world of Ike and JFK and Elvis, of big American cars and sock hops and cigarette smoke everywhere. From the dank little city of Derry, Maine (where there's Dunning business to conduct), to the warmhearted small town of Jodie, Texas, where Jake falls dangerously in love, every turn is leading eventually, of course, to a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and to Dallas, where the past becomes heart-stoppingly suspenseful, and where history might not be history anymore. Time-travel has never been so believable. Or so terrifying.
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