Skip to main content
Displaying 1 of 1
Because of Winn-Dixie
2000
Please select and request a specific volume by clicking one of the icons in the 'Find It' section below.
Find It
Map It
Fiction/Biography Profile
Awards
2001 - Newbery Honor Book
Characters
India Opal Buloni (Female), Motherless, Preacher's daughter; her mother abandoned the family seven years earlier
Winn-Dixie (Male), Dog, Big; ugly; sweet-tempered; charming; found as a stray in the town supermarket
Genre
Fiction
Domestic
Psychological
Southern fiction
Topics
Dogs
Motherless families
Fathers and daughters
Human-animal relationships
Small town life
Loneliness
Friendship
Personal growth
Emotional healing
Setting
Naomi, Florida - South (U.S.)
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Publishers Weekly Review

Through the love she gains from her new pet, a girl gains the courage to ask her father about the mother who abandoned them. "In this exquisitely crafted first novel [a Newbery Honor book], each chapter possesses an arc of its own and reads almost like a short story in its completeness," said PW in our Best Books of 2000 citation. Ages 8-up. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Summary
An unforgettable first novel about coming of age one sweet summer--and learning to love what you have. <br> <br> The summer Opal and her father, the preacher, move to Naomi, Florida, Opal goes into the Winn-Dixie supermarket--and comes out with a dog. A big, ugly, suffering dog with a sterling sense of humor. A dog she dubs Winn-Dixie. Because of Winn-Dixie, the preacher tells Opal ten things about her absent mother, one for each year Opal has been alive. Winn-Dixie is better at making friends than anyone Opal has ever known, and together they meet the local librarian, Miss Franny Block, who once fought off a bear with a copy of WAR AND PEACE. They meet Gloria Dump, who is nearly blind but sees with her heart, and Otis, an ex-con who sets the animals in his pet shop loose after hours, then lulls them with his guitar.<br> <br> Opal spends all that sweet summer collecting stories about her new friends and thinking about her mother. But because of Winn-Dixie or perhaps because she has grown, Opal learns to let go, just a little, and that friendship--and forgiveness--can sneak up on you like a sudden summer storm.<br> <br> Recalling the fiction of Harper Lee and Carson McCullers, here is a funny, poignant, and utterly genuine first novel from a major new talent.
Librarian's View
Displaying 1 of 1