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Travel as a political act
2009
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Fiction/Biography Profile
Genre
NonFiction
Adventure
Political
Topics
Travel
Travelers
Cultures
Politics
Sociology
Americans in foreign countries
Setting
- Europe
- Central American
- Asia
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Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

Travel writer and television host Steves (you can catch him on PBS and also on radio) departs from the usual where-to-go and what-to-see of travel books and here concentrates on why people, especially Americans, should travel. Drawing on his years of experience as traveler and tour guide, Steves provides many examples of how travel can broaden one's mind, whether challenging or confirming preset ideas. For example, visiting Morocco and Turkey can show how a Muslim country can be vibrant and hospitable. Even in familiar Europe, American travelers can learn that issues such as sex and drugs are treated much more pragmatically than they are Stateside. In Central America, the traveler can see firsthand the results of the Monroe Doctrine and globalization. Verdict As a nation, Americans don't much travel abroad, and Steves challenges them, arguing for the importance of seeing things for oneself. The corollary is that citizens of other countries (such as Iran) then get to meet face-to-face with Americans, a counterbalance to the rhetoric of our leaders. The author only mildly injects his own opinions into the larger argument, and then more as an example than a prescription. Excellent for those who read deeply in travel or are considering an international trip.-Dan Forrest, Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summary
<p>Travel connects people with people. It helps us fit more comfortably and compatibly into a shrinking world. And it inspires creative new solutions to persistent problems facing our nation. We can't understand our world without experiencing it. Traveling as a Political Act helps us take that first step.</p> <p>There's more to travel than good-value hotels, great art, and tasty cuisine. Americans who "travel as a political act" can have the time of their lives and come home smarter--with a better understanding of the interconnectedness of today's world and just how our nation fits in.</p> <p>In his new book, acclaimed travel writer Rick Steves explains how to travel more thoughtfully--to any destination. He shares a series of field reports from Europe, Central America, Asia, and the Middle East to show how his travels have shaped his politics and broadened his perspective.</p> <p>www.ricksteves.com</p>
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