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An Irish doctor in peace and at war
2014
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Fiction/Biography Profile
Characters
Barry Laverty (Male), Doctor, Irish, Recently became a partner in Dr. O'Reilly medial practice; enjoys his eccentric country patients; dealing with an outbreak of German measles
Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly (Male), Doctor, Irish, Eccentric, Remarried, Senior partner of his medical practice; reminiscences about the time he served as a surgeon lieutenant aboard a battleship; dealing with an outbreak of German measles; opens a women's clinic in his practice
Genre
Fiction
Medical
Humor
Historical
Domestic
Topics
Doctors
Patients
Patient care
Village life
Country life
Eccentrics
Memories
World War II
Epidemics
War memories
Setting
Northern Ireland - Europe
Time Period
1960s -- 20th century
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Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

Starred Review. The ninth book in the series that started with An Irish Country Doctor flashes back to a time before Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly became the medical mainstay in the village of Ballybucklebo. World War II has begun and Dr. Reilly is assigned the battleship HMS Warspite. Surgeon Lieutenant O'Reilly quickly learns the hardships of medicine at sea, tending to the thousand-man crew and casualties from other nearby ships. He serves under a seasoned naval doctor from whom he picks up much more than what was in his medical textbooks. He pines for his fiancee, midwife Deirdre Macwhinney, and has hopes of marrying her when he leaves the ship to attend a trauma medicine course in Scotland. In current-day Ballybucklebo, O'Reilly's life has turned out quite differently. He treats the odd outbreak of measles, encounters an exotic Mediterranean virus, and delivers the local babies when the village midwife is too busy. Married to Kitty, his long-ago love (before Deirdre), O'Reilly has settled into the comfortable life of a small-town doctor. As in the previous O'Reilly books, the story deftly shifts back and forth from the present to the past, weaving depth and texture into the lives of Dr. and Mrs. O'Reilly and the villagers around them. VERDICT This is a charming addition to the delightful series by Ulster doctor-turned-novelist Taylor. Deeply steeped in Irish country life and meticulous in detail, the story is the perfect companion for a comfy fire and a cup of tea or a pint of bitter. Think James Herriott without the animals. A totally wonderful read!-Susan Clifford Braun, Bainbridge Island, WA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summary
<p> Doctor O'Reilly heeds the call to serve his country in Irish Doctor in Peace and At War, the new novel in Patrick Taylor's beloved Irish Country series </p> <p>Long before Doctor Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly became a fixture in the colourful Irish village of Ballybucklebo, he was a young M.B. with plans to marry midwife Dierdre Mawhinney. Those plans were complicated by the outbreak of World War II and the call of duty. Assigned to the HMS Warspite , a formidable 30,000-ton battleship, Surgeon Lieutenant O'Reilly soon found himself face-to-face with the hardships of war, tending to the dreadnought's crew of 1,200 as well as to the many casualties brought aboard.</p> <p>Life in Ballybuckebo is a far cry from the strife of war, but over two decades later O'Reilly and his younger colleagues still have plenty of challenges: an outbreak of German measles, the odd tropical disease, a hard-fought pie-baking contest, and a local man whose mule-headed adherence to tradition is standing in the way of his son's future. Now older and wiser, O'Reilly has prescriptions for whatever ails...until a secret from the past threatens to unravel his own peace of mind.</p> <p>Shifting deftly between two very different eras, Patrick Taylor's latest Irish Country novel reveals more about O'Reilly's tumultuous past, even as Ballybucklebo faces the future in its own singular fashion.</p>
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