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Fiction/Biography Profile
Genre
Young adult
NonFiction
Graphic novel
History
Topics
Civil rights activists
Civil rights movements
Segregation
Protests
King, Martin Luther
Nonviolence
American history
Setting
- South (U.S.)
- United States
Time Period
-- 20th century
Large Cover Image
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  Library Journal Review

Comics artist Powell (The Silence of Our Friends; Swallow Me Whole) blogged that Congressman Lewis (Representative for the 5th U.S. Congressional Dist. of Georgia since 1986) "is the sole surviving member of the 'Big Six' of the Civil Rights movement, [and]...was integral in the historic marches from Selma to Montgomery, and generally helped smack institutionalized white supremacy in the nuts and changed the face of 20th century American Society." Growing up in the 1940s, Lewis rode a school bus down dirt roads because roads into "colored" communities weren't paved. Sixty years later, he was a guest of honor at Barack Obama's inauguration. Lewis's remarkable life has been skillfully translated into graphics with the assistance of writer Aydin, a staffer in Lewis's office and his capable Boswell. The art from Eisner and Ignatz Prize winner Powell is perfect for the story, ranging as it does from moody ink-wash to hand-drawn lettering. -VERDICT Segregation's insult to personhood comes across here with a visual, visceral punch. Suitable for tweens through teens and adults, this version of Lewis's life story belongs in libraries to teach readers about the heroes of America. Two more volumes are forthcoming, and a teacher's guide is available.-M.C. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

The long-overdue move to chronicle American history in graphic novel form takes another great step forward with this first volume of a projected history of the civil rights struggle. Instead of taking an all-inclusive, Eyes on the Prize-style approach (an epic undertaking that hopefully is on another artist's to-do list), March is told from the perspective of Georgia congressman John Lewis. Listed here as coauthor with Andrew Aydin, Lewis frames his story as a flashback told to a few inquisitive visitors in his Washington office as he is getting ready to attend the inauguration of President Barack Obama. It's an occasionally creaky device that slips sometimes into hagiography, but Lewis's tale is a resolutely dramatic one regardless. Highlighted by dark, neo-noirish art from Nate Powell (The Silence of Our Friends), March tracks Lewis from his hardscrabble childhood on a remote Georgia farm to his gradual awakening to the pernicious evil of segregation and his growing leadership role in Martin Luther King Jr.'s nonviolent resistance movement. If the book strays too far from Lewis himself at times, that's because the momentousness of what's happening around him cannot be ignored. Superbly told history. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Summary
#1 New York Times Bestseller <br> <br> Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon and key figure of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president.<br> <br> Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March , a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole ).<br> <br> March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.<br> <br> Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.<br> <br> Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story." Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.<br> <br> Winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award -- Special Recognition <br> #1 Washington Post Bestseller <br> A Coretta Scott King Honor Book <br> An ALA Notable Book <br> One of YALSA's Top 10 Great Graphic Novels for Teens <br> One of YALSA's Top 10 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults <br> One of YALSA's Outstanding Books for the College Bound <br> One of Reader's Digest 's Graphic Novels Every Grown-Up Should Read <br> Endorsed by NYC Public Schools' "NYC Reads 365" program <br> Selected for first-year reading programs by Michigan State University, Marquette University, and Georgia State University <br> Nominated for three Will Eisner Awards <br> Nominated for the Glyph Award <br> Named one of the best books of 2013 by USA Today , The Washington Post , Publishers Weekly , Library Journal, School Library Journal , Booklist , Kirkus Reviews , The Horn Book , Paste , Slate , ComicsAlliance , Amazon, and Apple iBooks.
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