Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Publisher, Date:
New York : Random House, c2010.
Description:
xviii, 473 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
Summary:
On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared--Lt. Louis Zamperini. Captured by the Japanese and driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor.
Subjects:
Other Title:
Notes:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 405-457) and index.
2 5 7 13 14 17 18 20 21 22 31 34 46 50 52 54 55 58 71 72 73 78 84 87 93 96 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 107 109 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 134 135 136 137 138 140 141 144 145 146 147 148 150 151 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 179 193 215 217 220 245 257 258 260 261 267 285 295 296 327 331
Contents:
The one-boy insurgency -- Run like mad -- The torrance tornado -- Plundering Germany -- Into war -- The flying coffin -- "This is it, boys" -- "Only the laundry knew how scared I was" -- Five hundred and ninety-four holes -- The stinking six -- "Nobody's going to live through this" -- Downed -- Missing at sea -- Thirst -- Sharks and bullets -- Singing in the clouds -- Typhoon -- A dead body breathing -- Two hundred silent men -- Farting for Hirohito -- Belief -- Plots afoot -- Monster -- Hunted -- B-29 -- Madness -- Falling down -- Enslaved -- Two hundred and twenty punches -- The boiling city -- The naked stampede -- Cascades of pink peaches -- Mother's Day -- The shimmering girl -- Coming undone -- The body on the mountain -- Twisted ropes -- A beckoning whistle -- Daybreak.
LCCN:
2010017517
ISBN:
9781400064168 (alk. paper)
1400064163 (alk. paper)
9781448755905 (Paw Prints)
9781400064168
1400064163
Other Number:
613293334
System Availability:
28
Current Holds:
7
# Local items:
28
Control Number:
323024
Call Number:
940.54/7252092 B
Course Reserves:
0
# Local items in:
2
# System items in:
2
Find It
Map It
Fiction/Biography Profile
Genre
Historical
NonFiction
War
Topics
World War II
World War II veterans
Airplane accidents
Survival
Redemption
Journeys
Setting
- Asia
Time Period
1943 -- 20th century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

The author of Seabiscuit now brings us a biography of World War II prisoner of war survivor Louis Zamperini (b. 1917). A track athlete at the 1936 Munich Olympics, Zamperini became a B-24 crewman in the U.S. Army Air Force. When his plane went down in the Pacific in 1943, he spent 47 days in a life raft, then was picked up by a Japanese ship and survived starvation and torture in labor camps. Eventually repatriated, he had a spiritual rebirth and returned to Japan to promote forgiveness and healing. Because of the author's popularity, libraries will want this book both for general readers who like a good story and for World War II history buffs; however, it's not essential reading for those who read Zamperini's autobiography, Devil at My Heels, with David Rensin, in its 2003 edition. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 7/10.] (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

From the 1936 Olympics to WWII Japan's most brutal POW camps, Hillenbrand's heart-wrenching new book is thousands of miles and a world away from the racing circuit of her bestselling Seabiscuit. But it's just as much a page-turner, and its hero, Louie Zamperini, is just as loveable: a disciplined champion racer who ran in the Berlin Olympics, he's a wit, a prankster, and a reformed juvenile delinquent who put his thieving skills to good use in the POW camps, In other words, Louie is a total charmer, a lover of life-whose will to live is cruelly tested when he becomes an Army Air Corps bombardier in 1941. The young Italian-American from Torrance, Calif., was expected to be the first to run a four-minute mile. After an astonishing but losing race at the 1936 Olympics, Louie was hoping for gold in the 1940 games. But war ended those dreams forever. In May 1943 his B-24 crashed into the Pacific. After a record-breaking 47 days adrift on a shark-encircled life raft with his pal and pilot, Russell Allen "Phil" Phillips, they were captured by the Japanese. In the "theater of cruelty" that was the Japanese POW camp network, Louie landed in the cruelest theaters of all: Omori and Naoetsu, under the control of Corp. Mutsuhiro Watanabe, a pathologically brutal sadist (called the Bird by camp inmates) who never killed his victims outright-his pleasure came from their slow, unending torment. After one beating, as Watanabe left Louie's cell, Louie saw on his face a "soft languor.... It was an expression of sexual rapture." And Louie, with his defiant and unbreakable spirit, was Watanabe's victim of choice. By war's end, Louie was near death. When Naoetsu was liberated in mid-August 1945, a depleted Louie's only thought was "I'm free! I'm free! I'm free!" But as Hillenbrand shows, Louie was not yet free. Even as, returning stateside, he impulsively married the beautiful Cynthia Applewhite and tried to build a life, Louie remained in the Bird's clutches, haunted in his dreams, drinking to forget, and obsessed with vengeance. In one of several sections where Hillenbrand steps back for a larger view, she writes movingly of the thousands of postwar Pacific PTSD sufferers. With no help for their as yet unrecognized illness, Hillenbrand says, "there was no one right way to peace; each man had to find his own path...." The book's final section is the story of how, with Cynthia's help, Louie found his path. It is impossible to condense the rich, granular detail of Hillenbrand's narrative of the atrocities committed (one man was exhibited naked in a Tokyo zoo for the Japanese to "gawk at his filthy, sore-encrusted body") against American POWs in Japan, and the courage of Louie and his fellow POWs, who made attempts on Watanabe's life, committed sabotage, and risked their own lives to save others. Hillenbrand's triumph is that in telling Louie's story (he's now in his 90s), she tells the stories of thousands whose suffering has been mostly forgotten. She restores to our collective memory this tale of heroism, cruelty, life, death, joy, suffering, remorselessness, and redemption. (Nov.) -Reviewed by Sarah F. Gold (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Summary
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE *nbsp;Hailed as the top nonfiction book of the year by Time magazine * Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography and the Indies Choice Adult Nonfiction Book of the Year award On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane's bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War. The lieutenant's name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he'd been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown. Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will. In her long-awaited new book, Laura Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit . Telling an unforgettable story of a man's journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit. Praise for Unbroken nbsp; "Extraordinarily moving . . . a powerfully drawn survival epic." -- The Wall Street Journal nbsp; "[A] one-in-a-billion story . . . designed to wrench from self-respecting critics all the blurby adjectives we normally try to avoid: It is amazing, unforgettable, gripping, harrowing, chilling, and inspiring." --New York nbsp; "Staggering . . . mesmerizing . . . Hillenbrand's writing is so ferociously cinematic, the events she describes so incredible, you don't dare take your eyes off the page." -- People nbsp; "A meticulous, soaring and beautifully written account of an extraordinary life." --The Washington Post nbsp; "Ambitious and powerful . . . a startling narrative and an inspirational book." --The New York Times Book Review nbsp; "Marvelous . . . Unbroken is wonderful twice over, for the tale it tells and for the way it's told. . . . It manages maximum velocity with no loss of subtlety." -- Newsweek nbsp; "Moving and, yes, inspirational . . . [Laura] Hillenbrand's unforgettable book . . . deserve[s] pride of place alongside the best works of literature that chart the complications and the hard-won triumphs of so-called ordinary Americans and their extraordinary time." --Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air nbsp; "Hillenbrand . . . tells [this] story with cool elegance but at a thrilling sprinter's pace." -- Time " Unbroken is too much book to hope for: a hellride of a story in the grip of the one writer who can handle it." --Christopher McDougall, author of Born to Run
Table of Contents
Mapp. xiv
Prefacep. xvii
Part I
1The One-Boy Insurgencyp. 3
2Run Like Madp. 13
3The Torrance Tornadop. 19
4Plundering Germanyp. 28
5Into Warp. 38
Part II
6The Flying Coffinp. 51
7ôThis Is It, Boysöp. 66
8ôOnly the Laundry Knew How Scared I Wasöp. 78
9Five Hundred and Ninety-four Holesp. 91
10The Stinking Sixp. 105
11ôNobody's Going to Live Through Thisöp. 114
Part III
12Downedp. 125
13Missing at Seap. 131
14Thirstp. 141
15Sharks and Bulletsp. 153
16Singing in the Cloudsp. 160
17Typhoonp. 169
Part IV
18A Dead Body Breathingp. 179
19Two Hundred Silent Menp. 189
20Farting for Hirohitop. 200
21Beliefp. 212
22Plots Afootp. 220
23Monsterp. 230
24Huntedp. 239
25B-29p. 248
26Madnessp. 259
27Falling Downp. 271
28Enslavedp. 277
29Two Hundred and Twenty Punchesp. 287
30The Boiling Cityp. 294
31The Naked Stampedep. 301
32Cascades of Pink Peachesp. 309
33Mother's Dayp. 319
Part V
34The Shimmering Girlp. 333
35Coming Undonep. 345
36The Body on the Mountainp. 354
37Twisted Ropesp. 362
38A Beckoning Whistlep. 368
39Daybreakp. 377
Epiloguep. 381
Acknowledgmentsp. 399
Notesp. 407
Indexp. 459
Librarian's View
Book
2010

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